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Jun 5, 2017 @ 21:39

Tinola, papaya vs sayote?

As a kid, tinola was never one of my favorites. It is now.

Reading Noli got me amused with tinola. I couldn’t understand Damaso’s rage for getting the neck when Ibarra got the chicken liver and gizzard. I’m a thigh person.

We used to cook our tinola with green papaya and some malunggay leaves. When I was told that my baby should start feeding solids, I would blitz the veggies in the tinola and pour it in an ice tray. I just defrost two cubes at a time when it’s her meal time.

Tinola is a very healthy dish. It’s made with chicken and veggies and very little oil. I didn’t enjoy it when we did it with papaya. When we started cooking it with sayote, I learned to appreciate it. In a restaurant in Tagaytay, they cook it with sayote and pechay and siling haba. That’s our favorite and that’s how we cook it at home most of the time.

Here’s our tinola recipe:

1 kg chicken, cut up
2 tbsp cooking oil
2 onions, sliced
1 knob ginger, sliced,
6 cloves garlic, crushed
2 sayote, peeled and cut up
250 grams pechay
3 green chilies
1 liter water
salt

Saute the onion, garlic, and ginger in oil. Add the chicken and season with salt if desired. When the chicken browns, add water. Simmer the chicken for 15 minutes. Add sayote and cook for 5 to 10 minutes. Add the pechay and green chilies and cook for another five minutes. Serve.

If you like tinola with upo, forget about all the other veggies but remember to add five chopped tomatoes before putting in the chicken.

If you are using papaya, replace the pechay with malunggay leaves and forget about the chilies,

And there you have it. Tinola cooked in three different ways, with each way distinct from the other.



 

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